Skip to main content

Table 1 Great reed warbler responses to experimental dummy dyads (see Methods and Figure 1 )

From: Color plumage polymorphism and predator mimicry in brood parasites

Experiment N Preference Continuous response Categorical response
   (%) Z P Z P
Specific recognition       
Gray cuckoo–Dove 18 100 85.5 <0.0001 45.5 0.0002
Rufous cuckoo–Dove 16 94 66.0 <0.0001 7.5 0.06
Kestrel–Dove 17 88 67.5 0.0005 7.5 0.06
Sparrowhawk–Dove 14 93 46.5 0.0016 5.0 0.13
Two morphs comparison       
Gray cuckoo–Rufous cuckoo 18 72 48.0 0.035 0.0 1.00
Mimicry       
Gray cuckoo–Sparrowhawk 23 96 135.0 <0.0001 7.5 0.06
Rufous cuckoo–Kestrel 20 70 35.0 0.20 0.0 1.00
  1. Dummies within dyads that were mobbed more than their paired dummy are in bold. “Preference” is the percentage of warbler pairs that more strongly responded to the more attacked dummy (in bold) than to the paired dummy. The “Specific recognition” set of experiments asked “Do warblers recognize dangerous enemies near the nest specifically?” by comparing responses to cuckoos/predators with responses to harmless control turtle dove. The “Mimicry” set of experiments asked “Do gray cuckoos mimic sparrowhawks and do rufous cuckoos mimic kestrels?” N = number of host pairs. Responses were measured either as number of contact attacks (Continuous response) or re-coded as presence vs. absence of attacks (Categorical response). See Discussion for rationale behind and implications of categorical re-coding. Differences tested with Wilcoxon sign-rank tests.